General Government

South Sudan’s President is Poised to Make Matters Worse| Latest from Nice

The regional IGAD group and the Security Council have both suggested that more peacekeepers are needed to stabilize South Sudan. Kiir apparently disagrees. This is problematic because new peacekeepers can only be deployed with his consent. “South Sudanese President, Salva Kiir said his government ‘will not accept a single soldier’ to back peacekeepers as demanded by regional leaders and the United Nations.Addressing reporters on Thursday for the first time since violence engulfed the country’s capital, Juba last week, Kiir said his country already has thousands of foreign troops at UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) as peacekeepers. ‘No. We will not accept even a single soldier,’ stressed the president.” (Sudan Tribune http://bit.ly/2adCN8p)

The Latest from Nice…At time of publication at least 77 people were confirmed killed in a Bastille Day attack. The reports are fast evolving and the Guardian (per usual) is doing an excellent job providing live and reliable updates. http://bit.ly/29Im3Hs

A New, New Plan for Syria? Secretary of State John Kerry held talks on Thursday with Russian President Vladimir Putin on a controversial U.S. proposal to coordinate with Moscow on military operations in Syria, in exchange for grounding Syria’s air force. The U.S. is proposing closer military coordination involving airstrikes against militant groups Nusra Front and Islamic State in Syria and wants Moscow in turn to use its influence to ground Syria’s air force, which has defied a cease-fire agreement to continue pounding civilian population centers. Mr. Kerry hopes the deal will reduce violence in Syria after more than five years of war.” (WSJ http://on.wsj.com/2adDgar)

Humanity Affirming News of the Day… The WHO has certified that  India has eliminated both yaws and maternal and neonatal tetanus. (UN News Center http://bit.ly/29HUu15)

Explainer of the Day… A excellent overview of the Continental Free Trade  Area that is being discussed at the African Union summit this week. It would be the largest free trade agreement in the world. (WaPo http://wapo.st/29HVna9

A gunman who shot dead six Kenyan police officers inside a police station in western Kenya on Thursday is a police officer himself, witnesses said…”I knew the man. His name was Maslah. He was Somali Kenyan police officer at the station,” the anonymous officer said. “He had submitted a resignation letter to leave the police to his superiors. … So I think the attack resulted from the fact that he was disgruntled.” (VOA http://bit.ly/29HW6rx

The UN has been accused of failing to act quickly enough to save hundreds of thousands of lives in northern Nigeria where a food crisis already killing hundreds of people a day is poised to become the most devastating in decades. (Guardian http://bit.ly/29Snaa0)

After more than a year of turmoil, Burundi is suspended in a “fake calm” with risks of further instability exacerbated by an economic slowdown, regional tensions and destructive ethnic rhetoric, a British parliamentary committee has heard. (Guardian http://bit.ly/29G6bTx)

A bird flu warning from the UN FAO: “In Cameroon alone, losses have added up to an estimated $20 million, according to local media reports. The recent outbreak in Cameroon has brought the number of countries that have battled bird flu in West and Central Africa to six, also including Burkina Faso, Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, Niger and Nigeria.” (UN News Center http://bit.ly/29HUQ7K)

France will end a three-year military peacekeeping operation in Central African Republic in October, François Hollande has said, although security remains volatile. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/29S6axR)

More than 1,000 people accused of supporting Boko Haram in Cameroon are being detained in military bases and prisons, often without any evidence, and dozens are dying from disease, malnutrition and torture, a rights group said on Thursday. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/29S6KvN)

Two soldiers have been arrested in Ivory Coast accused of failing to denounce suspected members of an al Qaeda cell that killed 19 people in a March attack on a beach resort town, military officials said on Thursday. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/29Sm6Dk)

Uganda’s army began evacuating citizens from inside neighboring South Sudan on Thursday where fighting between forces loyal to the president and his rival has plunged the nation into its worst crisis since the end of a two-year civil war. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/29S6vAX)

Many people in Zimbabwe can no longer afford hospital treatment and medication, and the number of those with medical aid has fallen by a third. (Bhekisisa http://bit.ly/29G7iT4)

Rising sea levels and coastal erosion are threatening the homes and livelihoods of hundreds of thousands of people across West Africa. (VOA http://bit.ly/29SlSfb)

Eritrea allowed use of one of its ports for a food aid shipment to South Sudan, marking the first time the World Food Program has used food assistance operations in Eritrea since 2006. (VOA http://bit.ly/29JNoua)

Eighteen influential Liberian civil society organizations warned today that efforts to forge a lasting peace are in jeopardy, threatened by the failure of Liberia’s legislature to pass a long-promised law recognizing the rights of rural communities to their customary lands. (CSO Working Group http://bit.ly/29JNbHF)

The IMF has approved a three-year, $5.34 Billion loan for Iraq focused on implementing economic and financial policies to help the country cope with lower oil prices and ensure debt sustainability. (IMF http://bit.ly/2adCRFd)

Turkey’s prime minister says he is sure relations will normalize with Syria. Bilateral relations collapsed as a result of Ankara’s backing of the Syrian opposition, but a major change in Turkish foreign policy could be in the offing. (VOA http://bit.ly/29G5Pw3)

Asia

India’s ambitious plans to develop infrastructure, mining and renewable energy threaten to force more of the most marginalized groups from their homes, widening inequality and fanning tensions, a global research group warned on Thursday. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/29SlWfi)

Philippine soldiers on Thursday killed 11 members of a Muslim guerrilla faction, an army commander said, underscoring volatility in the resource-rich south of the country as a new government seeks ways to end decades of conflict. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/29S5VD7)

An international rights group says a quarter of all Afghan children work for a living yet the government fails to protect them from injury, death or exploitation. (AP http://yhoo.it/29G7cLn)

Ineffectual attacks by the Islamic State group’s followers in Southeast Asia have shown them to be fragmented and lacking in the expertise that has produced devastating death tolls elsewhere in the world. (AP http://yhoo.it/29JNvpO)

El Salvador’s Supreme Court declared as unconstitutional a 1993 law that prohibited the prosecution of crimes committed by the military and leftist guerillas during the Central American country’s bloody civil war. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/29S5KI5)

The United Nations on Thursday said Ukraine’s forces had indiscriminately shelled residents while pro-Russian insurgents and Kiev battalions had summarily killed civilians in what may have constituted “war crimes”. (AFP http://yhoo.it/29JNbqT)

Congress actually did something good! Here’s what you need to know about the new Global Food Security Act. (Global Dispatches podcast http://bit.ly/1sETycl)

Desertification: an ecological reality or a dangerous myth? (Guardian http://bit.ly/29SlaPn)

The Global South’s Untold Human Rights Legacy (Inter Press Service http://bit.ly/29G5x8t)

Making El Salvador’s abortion law more punitive would compound injustice (Guardian http://bit.ly/29S63Cv)

Discussion

comments…

General Government

South Sudan’s President is Poised to Make Matters Worse

The regional IGAD group and the Security Council have both suggested that more peacekeepers are needed to stabilize South Sudan. Kiir apparently disagrees. This is problematic because new peacekeepers can only be deployed with his consent. “South Sudanese President, Salva Kiir said his government ‘will not accept a single soldier’ to back peacekeepers as demanded by regional leaders and the United Nations.Addressing reporters on Thursday for the first time since violence engulfed the country’s capital, Juba last week, Kiir said his country already has thousands of foreign troops at UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) as peacekeepers. ‘No. We will not accept even a single soldier,’ stressed the president.” (Sudan Tribune http://bit.ly/2adCN8p)

A New, New Plan for Syria? Secretary of State John Kerry held talks on Thursday with Russian President Vladimir Putin on a controversial U.S. proposal to coordinate with Moscow on military operations in Syria, in exchange for grounding Syria’s air force. The U.S. is proposing closer military coordination involving airstrikes against militant groups Nusra Front and Islamic State in Syria and wants Moscow in turn to use its influence to ground Syria’s air force, which has defied a cease-fire agreement to continue pounding civilian population centers. Mr. Kerry hopes the deal will reduce violence in Syria after more than five years of war.” (WSJ http://on.wsj.com/2adDgar)

Humanity Affirming News of the Day… The WHO has certified that  India has eliminated both yaws and maternal and neonatal tetanus. (UN News Center http://bit.ly/29HUu15)

Explainer of the Day… A excellent overview of the Continental Free Trade  Area that is being discussed at the African Union summit this week. It would be the largest free trade agreement in the world. (WaPo http://wapo.st/29HVna9

A gunman who shot dead six Kenyan police officers inside a police station in western Kenya on Thursday is a police officer himself, witnesses said…”I knew the man. His name was Maslah. He was Somali Kenyan police officer at the station,” the anonymous officer said. “He had submitted a resignation letter to leave the police to his superiors. … So I think the attack resulted from the fact that he was disgruntled.” (VOA http://bit.ly/29HW6rx

The UN has been accused of failing to act quickly enough to save hundreds of thousands of lives in northern Nigeria where a food crisis already killing hundreds of people a day is poised to become the most devastating in decades. (Guardian http://bit.ly/29Snaa0)

After more than a year of turmoil, Burundi is suspended in a “fake calm” with risks of further instability exacerbated by an economic slowdown, regional tensions and destructive ethnic rhetoric, a British parliamentary committee has heard. (Guardian http://bit.ly/29G6bTx)

A bird flu warning from the UN FAO: “In Cameroon alone, losses have added up to an estimated $20 million, according to local media reports. The recent outbreak in Cameroon has brought the number of countries that have battled bird flu in West and Central Africa to six, also including Burkina Faso, Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, Niger and Nigeria.” (UN News Center http://bit.ly/29HUQ7K)

France will end a three-year military peacekeeping operation in Central African Republic in October, François Hollande has said, although security remains volatile. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/29S6axR)

More than 1,000 people accused of supporting Boko Haram in Cameroon are being detained in military bases and prisons, often without any evidence, and dozens are dying from disease, malnutrition and torture, a rights group said on Thursday. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/29S6KvN)

Two soldiers have been arrested in Ivory Coast accused of failing to denounce suspected members of an al Qaeda cell that killed 19 people in a March attack on a beach resort town, military officials said on Thursday. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/29Sm6Dk)

Uganda’s army began evacuating citizens from inside neighboring South Sudan on Thursday where fighting between forces loyal to the president and his rival has plunged the nation into its worst crisis since the end of a two-year civil war. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/29S6vAX)

Many people in Zimbabwe can no longer afford hospital treatment and medication, and the number of those with medical aid has fallen by a third. (Bhekisisa http://bit.ly/29G7iT4)

Rising sea levels and coastal erosion are threatening the homes and livelihoods of hundreds of thousands of people across West Africa. (VOA http://bit.ly/29SlSfb)

Eritrea allowed use of one of its ports for a food aid shipment to South Sudan, marking the first time the World Food Program has used food assistance operations in Eritrea since 2006. (VOA http://bit.ly/29JNoua)

Eighteen influential Liberian civil society organizations warned today that efforts to forge a lasting peace are in jeopardy, threatened by the failure of Liberia’s legislature to pass a long-promised law recognizing the rights of rural communities to their customary lands. (CSO Working Group http://bit.ly/29JNbHF)

The IMF has approved a three-year, $5.34 Billion loan for Iraq focused on implementing economic and financial policies to help the country cope with lower oil prices and ensure debt sustainability. (IMF http://bit.ly/2adCRFd)

Turkey’s prime minister says he is sure relations will normalize with Syria. Bilateral relations collapsed as a result of Ankara’s backing of the Syrian opposition, but a major change in Turkish foreign policy could be in the offing. (VOA http://bit.ly/29G5Pw3)

Asia

India’s ambitious plans to develop infrastructure, mining and renewable energy threaten to force more of the most marginalized groups from their homes, widening inequality and fanning tensions, a global research group warned on Thursday. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/29SlWfi)

Philippine soldiers on Thursday killed 11 members of a Muslim guerrilla faction, an army commander said, underscoring volatility in the resource-rich south of the country as a new government seeks ways to end decades of conflict. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/29S5VD7)

An international rights group says a quarter of all Afghan children work for a living yet the government fails to protect them from injury, death or exploitation. (AP http://yhoo.it/29G7cLn)

Ineffectual attacks by the Islamic State group’s followers in Southeast Asia have shown them to be fragmented and lacking in the expertise that has produced devastating death tolls elsewhere in the world. (AP http://yhoo.it/29JNvpO)

El Salvador’s Supreme Court declared as unconstitutional a 1993 law that prohibited the prosecution of crimes committed by the military and leftist guerillas during the Central American country’s bloody civil war. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/29S5KI5)

The United Nations on Thursday said Ukraine’s forces had indiscriminately shelled residents while pro-Russian insurgents and Kiev battalions had summarily killed civilians in what may have constituted “war crimes”. (AFP http://yhoo.it/29JNbqT)

Congress actually did something good! Here’s what you need to know about the new Global Food Security Act. (Global Dispatches podcast http://bit.ly/1sETycl)

Desertification: an ecological reality or a dangerous myth? (Guardian http://bit.ly/29SlaPn)

The Global South’s Untold Human Rights Legacy (Inter Press Service http://bit.ly/29G5x8t)

Making El Salvador’s abortion law more punitive would compound injustice (Guardian http://bit.ly/29S63Cv)

Discussion

comments…

General Government

More Peacekeepers to Mali?

After a series of attacks, the U.N. is calling for reinforcements to the world’s most dangerous peacekeeping mission. “Secretary General Ban Ki-moon is seeking some 2,500 more peacekeepers to reinforce the United Nations mission in Mali, which has seen 12 of its members killed in May alone. Spokesman Stephane Dujarric said Thursday the troops would include a rapid reaction force, an aviation unit and specialists in high security convoys among other things. “I think it’s clear to everyone that the security situation in parts of Mali have deteriorated. I think the U.N. staff have paid for it in blood,” he said.” (AP http://abcn.ws/1ZhfMn8)

Airdrops (possibly) on the way… “Plans to airlift supplies to besieged towns in Syria inched ahead on Thursday amid concern from Russia and others about the safety of aid workers and uncertainty whether Damascus will approve, a U.N. official said… The United States and Britain have urged the U.N. to press ahead with air drops because Syria has not sufficiently opened up access to aid. Syria’s opposition has warned that the government may open the door just enough to defuse the international pressure before restricting access again.” (Reuters http://reut.rs/1X147Lg)

Turkey goes to Africa…Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan is being accompanied by a huge commercial delegation on his two-nation tour of Africa. Hundreds of business representatives have joined him on his trip to Uganda and Kenya to explore ways and means of intensifying economic ties with these two countries. The meeting with his Ugandan opposition number Yoweri Museveni was even branded “historic” as it was the first official visit ever to Uganda by a Turkish president. (DW http://bit.ly/286N9iB)

Somali security forces have brought to an end a bomb and gun attack by militants on a central Mogadishu hotel that killed at least 16 people and wounded 55, authorities said on Thursday. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/1XTOVyE)

More than 300 students at a high school in Burundi have been suspended for defacing a photo of President Pierre Nkurunziza, parents and an official told AFP on Thursday. (AFP http://yhoo.it/22ATmPS)

Mozambique’s grain production fell 4.8 percent to 2.39 million tonnes last year from 2.51 million tonnes the previous year, the minister of agriculture said on Thursday, blaming a severe drought. (Reuters http://bit.ly/286GCV0)

A court in Kenya’s port city of Mombasa released 43 men on Thursday who had been charged with being members of a group that seeks the independence of the Coast region from the hinterland. (Reuters http://bit.ly/22ATG0Y)

Nigeria’s vice-president on Thursday launched a $1 billion oil pollution clean-up program in the Niger delta, after President Muhammadu Buhari pulled out of visiting the restive region. (AFP http://yhoo.it/1XTN39g)

Authorities in Burkina Faso have arrested six people suspected of involvement in a militant attack in January claimed by al Qaeda’s regional branch in which 32 people were killed at a cafe and hotel in the capital. (Reuters http://bit.ly/1sQ4eMZ)

Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari canceled at the last minute a visit planned for Thursday to the oil-producing Niger Delta as militants attacked a boat belonging to state oil firm NNPC, the latest violence in the restive region. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/1U0xB9Y)

Huge quantities of live chickens and other table birds are stockpiling in Kiossi on Cameroon’s southern border, following a ban on Cameroon table birds by neighboring Gabon and Equatorial Guinea. The ban was announced as a result of the resurgence of the avian influenza virus that has claimed 40,000 birds. (VOA http://bit.ly/20W3jWu)

Human Rights Watch on Thursday condemned the decision of Bahrain’s appeals court to double the jail term of Shiite opposition chief Sheikh Ali Salman as a “travesty of justice”. (AFP http://yhoo.it/22ATHlt)

The bodies of at least 85 migrants who drowned trying to cross the Mediterranean have been washed up near the western Libyan city of Zuwara, a Red Crescent official said on Thursday. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/1sQ3UxN)

U.S. efforts to get badly needed aid from Turkey to Syria are being hampered by the ongoing impasse in negotiations and the Syrian government’s continuing siege on areas held by opposition groups, including those supported by Washington. (VOA http://bit.ly/1WyxSDg)

Plans to airlift supplies to besieged towns in Syria inched ahead on Thursday amid concern from Russia and others about the safety of aid workers and uncertainty whether Damascus will approve, a U.N. official said. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/20W2MEb)

Plans to airlift supplies to besieged towns in Syria inched ahead on Thursday amid concern from Russia and others about the safety of aid workers and uncertainty whether Damascus will approve, a U.N. official said. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/1Wyxe8L)

New report says half of all 68 UNRWA schools in Lebanon have been directly impacted by conflict and violence. (UN OCHA http://bit.ly/1sQ2iEt)

After refusing to pay bail, Egypt’s former top auditor has been detained over allegations he spread false news, his lawyers said Thursday. (AP http://yhoo.it/22ATyP2)

Around 20 towns in Syria are currently besieged, mainly by the forces of President Bashar al-Assad’s regime but also by rebels and jihadists. (AFP http://yhoo.it/286G1CH)

Pakistan has introduced new policies along its border with Afghanistan, ostensibly to reduce cross-border terrorism. But the measures are also likely to add to human suffering for the thousands of people who frequently travel back and forth for work or medical treatment. (VOA http://bit.ly/22ATVZY)

A judge Thursday postponed the trial of Bangladesh’s former Prime Minister Khaleda Zia while she asks the country’s top court to stop her prosecution in the graft and abuse of authority case. (AP http://yhoo.it/1XTNobU)

Philippine communist rebels said Thursday that long-stalled peace talks could be resumed with the government of incoming President Rodrigo Duterte as early as July, and that they will demand an end to the U.S. military presence in the country. (AP http://yhoo.it/1sQ4Thq)

Sri Lanka performed final Buddhist rites at the site of last month’s massive landslide Thursday and ended the search for some 100 people believed to have been buried under the broken earth. (AP http://yhoo.it/1sQ4E69)

An Indian court on Thursday convicted 24 people of involvement in the massacre of Muslims during religious riots in the state of Gujarat in 2002, when Prime Minister Narendra Modi was chief minister there. (WSJ http://on.wsj.com/1Uy4hq9)

Sri Lanka lifted a ban on issuing passports to its citizens who sought refuge abroad from violent conflict or political persecution, saying the ban issued by a previous government violated the rights of citizens forced to flee for their own safety. (AP http://yhoo.it/286IaOO)

A Haitian prosecutor has withdrawn a travel ban he issued against nine former electoral officials and 11 Cabinet ministers in ex-President Michel Martelly’s government. (AP http://yhoo.it/22ATy1B)

A throng of protesters demanding food made a run for the Venezuelan presidential palace on Thursday in a rare, apparently spontaneous outburst of anger at the socialist administration within the heart of Caracas. (AP http://yhoo.it/22ATRcC)

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s socialist government said on Wednesday a move by the head of the Organization of American States to censure the country for breaching democratic norms is an “imperialist” scheme to take the OPEC member’s oil. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/286HA3D)

Three prisoners were killed and 19 wounded in disturbances at the same prison in northern Mexico where 49 died in a riot in February, officials said Thursday. (AP http://yhoo.it/1sQ4c7P)

As Colombia nears a historic peace deal with the rebels of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, the nation’s authorities are struggling to tame an increase in farming of coca, the raw material used to make cocaine. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/22ATPBq)

American cyclist Tejay van Garderen understands the chances that he might contract the Zika virus at the Rio Olympics are minimal, and that precautions could be taken to further reduce the threat. (AP http://yhoo.it/1U0wd77)

Indigenous people in Panama are using drones as a new weapon to monitor deforestation on their lands as thousands of hectares disappear every year in one of the world’s most biodiverse rainforests, the United Nations said. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/286HvwW)

A commission created to audit Puerto Rico’s debt is questioning the legality of government-issued bonds in a report released Thursday, saying the struggling U.S. territory might not be responsible for paying a portion of the money owed. (AP http://yhoo.it/1U0yb7C)

International medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres on Thursday urged Turkey to open its border to some 100,000 displaced Syrians trapped by fighting including a recent Islamic State advance. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/1sQ4dbW)

France will accept 400 refugees per month from Greece as part of the EU relocation deal it signed last year, Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve said Thursday. (AFP http://yhoo.it/1U0wcQB)

Turkey recalled its ambassador to Germany on Thursday in protest against a parliament resolution declaring the 1915 massacre of Armenians by Ottoman forces a genocide at a time when Europe is looking for Ankara’s help in the migrant crisis. (Reuters http://reut.rs/1Uy3ZPR)

France will declare a state of natural catastrophe in the areas most affected by flooding in recent days, President Francois Hollande said on Thursday. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/1sQ4uLY)

The European Union needs to work more with African countries to tackle migration flows into the continent, France’s prime minister said in an interview with a Greek newspaper on Thursday. (Reuters http://bit.ly/1sQ4k7r)

Opinion/Blogs

No, we shouldn’t cancel the Rio Olympics because of Zika. Because, science. (Global Dispatches Podcast http://bit.ly/285FIIx)

Is Good Governance Key To Eliminating Poverty? (IPS http://bit.ly/1UxSWGB)

Conference rage: ‘How did awful panel discussions become the default format?’ (Guardian http://bit.ly/1U0p5Yv)

Immigration raids stoke fear, but do they stop illegal immigration? (Global Post http://bit.ly/1t4CGnQ)

As it expands in Africa, Uber adapts to local markets and adopts cash payments (TechCrunch http://tcrn.ch/286HYiw)

The Anticorruption Boom and U.S. Foreign Policy (CFR http://on.cfr.org/286LWrt)

Germany Recognizes Armenian Genocide. Will This Upend the Refugee Deal? (UN Dispatch http://bit.ly/286Mbms)

Corruption Among Development NGOs, Part 1–Getting the Facts (Global Anticorruption Blog http://bit.ly/1PoEOAs)

Countering violence against women and girls: Is UK aid a ‘litmus test’? (Devex http://bit.ly/20W7im1)

Community Philanthropy: it’s a thing, and you need to know about it (From Poverty to Power http://bit.ly/20W6JZn)

Discussion

comments…

General Information

Order of Canada Investiture Ceremony

May 6, 2015

Governor General to Invest 50 Recipients into the Order of Canada

OTTAWA—His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada, will preside over an Order of Canada investiture ceremony at Rideau Hall, on Friday, May 8, 2015, at 10:30 a.m. The Governor General, who is chancellor and Principal Companion of the Order, will bestow the honour on 2 Companions, 10 Officers and 38 Members.

The Order of Canada was created in 1967, during Canada’s centennial year, to recognize outstanding achievement, dedication to the community and service to the nation. Since its creation, more than 6 000 people from all sectors of society have been invested into the Order.

A schedule for the investiture ceremony, the list of recipients with citations, and a backgrounder on the Order of Canada are attached.

–30–

Media interested in covering this event and interviewing recipients are asked to contact the Rideau Hall Press Office and must arrive at the Princess Anne Entrance no later than 10:15 a.m. on the day of the ceremony.

Media information

Marie-Pierre Bélanger
Rideau Hall Press Office
613-998-9166
marie-pierre.belanger@gg.ca

Follow GGDavidJohnston and RideauHall on Facebook and Twitter.


CEREMONY SCHEDULE

Members of the media are asked to observe the following schedule:

9:45 a.m.:

Media arrive at Rideau Hall

10:30 a.m.:

Ceremony begins

 

The Governor General speaks

 

The Governor General presents the insignia
(Companions first, followed by Officers and Members)

11:45 a.m.:

Interviews with recipients

 

RECIPIENTS

COMPANIONS OF THE ORDER OF CANADA

David Cronenberg, C.C., O.Ont.
This is a promotion within the Order.

Toronto, Ont.

Richard W. Pound, C.C., O.Q.
This is a promotion within the Order.

Montréal, Que.

OFFICERS OF THE ORDER OF CANADA

Marion Bogo, O.C.

Toronto, Ont.

Philip Branton, O.C.

Saint-Lambert, Que.

G. Raymond Chang, O.C. (deceased)

Toronto, Ont.

David F. Denison, O.C.

Toronto, Ont.

David Goldbloom, O.C.

Toronto, Ont.

Norman B. Keevil, O.C.

West Vancouver, B.C.

Patrick Delamere Lafferty, O.C.

Ottawa, Ont.

Steve Paikin, O.C., O.Ont.

Toronto, Ont.

John M. Thompson, O.C.

Toronto, Ont.

Shirley Marie Tilghman, O.C.

Princeton, NJ, USA and Toronto, Ont.

MEMBERS OF THE ORDER OF CANADA

Kim Baird, C.M.

Tsawwassen, B.C.

David F. Blair, C.M.

Québec, Que.

Guy Breton, C.M.

Montréal, Que.

Lisa Brown, C.M., M.S.M.

Toronto, Ont.

Vickie Cammack, C.M., M.S.M.

Surrey, B.C.

Timothy Casgrain, C.M.

Toronto, Ont.

Jean Chamberlain-Froese, C.M.

Hamilton, Ont.

George Cope, C.M.

Toronto, Ont.

Victor Davies, C.M.

Toronto, Ont.

François Dompierre, C.M., C.Q.

Sutton, Que.

Terrence Donnelly, C.M., O.Ont.

Toronto, Ont.

Morton Doran, C.M.

Fairmont Hot Springs, B.C.

Allan Etmanski, C.M., M.S.M.

Surrey, B.C.

Charles Foran, C.M.

Toronto, Ont.

Cyril Basil Frank C.M. (deceased)

Calgary, Alta.

Ross Gaudreault, C.M., O.Q.

Saint-Ferréol-les-Neiges, Que.

Christiane Germain, C.M., C.Q.

Montréal, Que.

Jean Giguère, C.M.

Winnipeg, Man.

The Honourable William C. Graham, P.C., C.M.

Toronto, Ont.

Dorothy Grant, C.M.

Delta, B.C.

Jocelyn Greene, C.M.

St. John’s, N.L.

H. Wayne Hambly, C.M., O.P.E.I.

Charlottetown, P.E.I.

James D. Irving, C.M.

Saint John, N.B.

Ronald Jamieson, C.M.

Ohsweken, Ont.

Sheldon Kennedy, C.M.

Calgary, Alta.

Ricardo Larrivée, C.M.

Chambly, Que.

James William Leech, C.M.

Toronto, Ont.

The Honourable Edward Lumley, P.C., C.M.

Lancaster, Ont.

Malcolm Bruce McNiven, C.M.

Montréal, Que.

Diane Morin, C.M.

Charlemagne, Que.

John R. Porter, C.M., C.Q.

Québec, Que.

Marcia Hampton Rioux, C.M.

Toronto, Ont.

Ronald Rosenes, C.M.

Toronto, Ont.

Donna Eileen Stewart, C.M.

Toronto, Ont.

Ian Tannock, C.M.

Toronto, Ont.

Alan Robert Twigg, C.M.

Vancouver, B.C.

Norman Willis, C.M.

Ottawa, Ont.

Catherine Zahn, C.M.

Toronto, Ont.

RECIPIENTS’ CITATIONS

COMPANIONS OF THE ORDER OF CANADA

David Cronenberg, C.C., O.Ont. Toronto, Ontario

David Cronenberg has cemented his place in the world’s top echelon of filmmakers. Our foremost cinematic ambassador, he is one of the few Canadians who commands the respect of the worldwide film industry by dint of a predominantly homegrown reputation. In 2006, he added the Cannes Film Festival’s Carrosse d’Or to his growing collection of international accolades, which includes jury prizes from two of the world’s most prestigious film festivals. Nonetheless, he remains unflagging in his support of Canadian cinema and continues to staff his international projects with Canadian cast and crew members.

This is a promotion within the Order.

Richard W. Pound, C.C., O.Q.
Montréal, Quebec

Richard Pound is a champion of fairness in sport and a prime example of civic engagement. He is admired for his dedication to the Olympic ideal of personal excellence and fair play, and has held key positions at the national and international levels. As the founding president of the World Anti-Doping Agency, he helped create the first World Anti-Doping Code, which irrevocably changed amateur and professional sport. A distinguished lawyer as well as chancellor emeritus of McGill University, he also devotes his energy to many community organizations.

This is a promotion within the Order.

OFFICERS OF THE ORDER OF CANADA

Marion Bogo, O.C.
Toronto, Ontario

Marion Bogo has had a far-reaching impact on the academic discipline and practice of social work. A professor, scholar and administrator at the University of Toronto, she is regarded for her extensive work in curriculum design for social work programs, notably in the area of field education. She is also a pioneer in developing standardized evaluation methods, which are used by instructors worldwide to assess professional competency. She continues to share her expertise with schools of social work across Canada and beyond our borders.

Philip Branton, O.C.
Saint-Lambert, Quebec

Philip Branton is one of our nation’s most influential cancer research strategists. As the director of the Institute of Cancer Research of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, he spearheaded the integration of all 30 Canadian cancer research agencies to create a single strategic planning organization. He also implemented initiatives to spur collaborative research in new areas of oncology research, including tumour banking and palliative care. A professor of biochemistry at McGill University, he has made internationally recognized contributions to our understanding of the mechanisms by which normal cells become malignant.

G. Raymond Chang, O.C. (deceased)
Toronto, Ontario

Raymond Chang believed in making a difference. After working in his family’s bakery business in Jamaica, he came to Canada to pursue his post-secondary studies and to seek new opportunities. He went on to establish a leading financial services company and devoted himself to giving back to his adopted home. Chancellor emeritus of Ryerson University, he was well known for his engagement and philanthropy in health care, education and entrepreneurship. His sustained generosity helped transform lives and entire communities in Canada and in the Caribbean.

The insignia presented to the late Mr. Raymond Chang will be received by his wife Mrs. Donette Chin-Loy Chang, and his son, Mr. Andrew Chang.

David F. Denison, O.C.
Toronto, Ontario

David Denison has applied his business acumen to improve the financial security of Canadians. He served as a senior executive in the financial services sector before translating his expertise to benefit all Canadians as the president and CEO of the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board. In this capacity he transformed the board’s investment strategy and increased its international presence, contributing to Canada’s global reputation for having an effective retirement income system. He has also been active with United Way Toronto and the Toronto Community Foundation.

David Goldbloom, O.C.
Toronto, Ontario

David Goldbloom is passionate about enhancing mental health care in Canada. A practicing psychiatrist, he is a professor at the University of Toronto and the founding physician-in-chief at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. Now, as the chair of the Mental Health Commission of Canada, he has helped build a national mental health strategy and is playing a central role in changing public attitudes about mental health issues. Within his community, he has provided guidance to a range of cultural organizations including the Glenn Gould Foundation and the Stratford Festival.

Norman B. Keevil, O.C.
West Vancouver, British Columbia

For more than 50 years, Norman Keevil has been a bold and visionary leader in Canada’s mining industry. Under his guidance, his company evolved into a world-class entity that has accrued economic benefits for all Canadians. As a generous and civic-minded industry spokesman, he has funded education and research in geology and mineral development, and has donated to a host of community-building initiatives. He serves as an exemplary role model for future generations of entrepreneurs.

Patrick Delamere Lafferty, O.C.
Ottawa, Ontario

Patrick Lafferty has devoted many years to improving and advancing Canada’s medical research infrastructure. An accountant and management consultant by profession, he has shared his expertise with health researchers in medical organizations across the country. By helping them develop new planning models and attract crucial funding, he turns their visions into transformative realities. Notably, he was instrumental in establishing both the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Steve Paikin, O.C., O.Ont.
Toronto, Ontario

Steve Paikin is making an important contribution to public discourse in Canada. One of our most respected and influential journalists, he has hosted several current affairs programs on TVO over the last two decades. Curiosity, fairness and impartiality are the hallmarks of his reporting, as he has asked tough and probing questions of our leaders, helping to broaden Canadians’ understanding of the crucial issues of the day. Chancellor of Laurentian University, he is also a sought-out moderator and is the author of several books, notably on national and provincial politics.

John M. Thompson, O.C.
Toronto, Ontario

John Thompson has made leading contributions in the information technology and business sectors. A former senior executive at IBM headquarters, he played a key role in the company’s radical reorientation from a focus on mainframe computers to business services and software. He was also a catalyst in the creation of advanced centres to foster collaboration between leading academics and industry partners. More recently, he served as the board chair of Toronto-Dominion Bank, overseeing a period of significant growth for the institution. He is also a notable leader at Western University and with the board of trustees of the Hospital for Sick Children.

Shirley Marie Tilghman, O.C.
Princeton, New Jersey, USA and Toronto, Ontario

Shirley Tilghman is a renowned molecular biologist and academic administrator. As a professor and scientist, she played a role in the first successful cloning of a mammalian gene and made important discoveries in the field of embryonic development. In 2001, she was named president of Princeton University and led the school with distinction for over a decade. Throughout her tenure, she was a catalyst for the advancement of women leaders in post-secondary institutions across North America. She has also been a mentor to a number of Canadian university presidents and serves as co-chair of the Canada Excellence Research Chairs program.

MEMBERS OF THE ORDER OF CANADA

Kim Baird, C.M.
Tsawwassen, British Columbia

Kim Baird is a driver of transformational change. At the age of 29, she was elected chief of the Tsawwassen First Nation and served for six consecutive terms. She was responsible for negotiating and implementing British Columbia’s first urban treaty, giving her people ownership and governance over their land and resources. She has shared her expertise in First Nations policy, governance and economic development with the broader community, and sits on several boards and committees. Also an important role model, she strongly supports the leadership development of young women.

David F. Blair, C.M.
Québec, Quebec

David Blair has enriched the vitality of the City of Québec’s heritage. A lawyer by profession, he has helped to build bridges between linguistic communities. He has long promoted the pluralistic character of Quebec society, and is known for his tireless leadership of such organizations as the Voice of English-Speaking Quebec, the Jeffery Hale Foundation, and the Literary and Historical Society of Quebec. He has also been chancellor of the Anglican Diocese of Quebec for 15 years, and played an important role in highlighting the history of his city as secretary of Québec’s 400th Anniversary Committee.

Guy Breton, C.M.
Montréal, Quebec

Guy Breton has distinguished himself as a leader and a man of vision in Quebec’s medical and academic communities. A physician specializing in radiology, he was notably the president of the Association des radiologistes du Québec and helped create the Quebec Breast Cancer Screening Program. He was also an agent of change at the Université de Montréal in radiology and in the optimum use of human and technological resources. Today, as rector, he helps promote the university on the world stage and has signed major agreements with universities around the world.

Lisa Brown, C.M., M.S.M.
Toronto, Ontario

Lisa Brown is driven by the conviction that artistic expression can have a positive impact on people living with mental illness or addictions. Over 28 years ago, she founded Workman Arts, an innovative and unique organization that provides artists with mental health or addiction challenges with professional training, performance space and exhibition opportunities. She also founded the Rendezvous with Madness Film Festival, the Being Scene Art Exhibition, the Madness and Arts World Festival and the Mad Couture Catwalk to help break down stereotypes about mental illness and increase our understanding of the connection between arts and healing.

Vickie Cammack, C.M., M.S.M.
Surrey, British Columbia

Family and disability advocate Vickie Cammack is changing how we support our most vulnerable citizens. She co-founded PLAN, an organization that helps Canadians secure the financial and social futures of loved ones with disabilities. PLAN’s model has now been emulated in more than 30 locations around the world. Possessed of a remarkable capacity to find practical solutions to social problems, she is also the founding director of the Family Support Institute and creator of Tyze Personal Networks. Tyze uses secure online networks to connect individuals, their families and their care professionals in order to coordinate support. The initiative is considered the next frontier in caregiving.

Timothy Casgrain, C.M.
Toronto, Ontario

Tim Casgrain has helped to enrich communities across Canada. A business executive by profession, he has dedicated much of his time to advancing causes in the areas of literacy, health research, culture and history. He is well known for his fundraising capacity and philanthropic leadership, and has chaired many national and local organizations including the Toronto Rehab Foundation and Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame. In the latter role, he was instrumental in leading the Hall’s rejuvenation and the creation of its permanent location in Calgary.

Jean Chamberlain-Froese, C.M.
Hamilton, Ontario

Jean Chamberlain is committed to improving maternal health in developing countries. She is an obstetrician and associate professor at McMaster University, and is an outspoken champion of system-wide approaches to reduce death associated with pregnancy or childbirth in poor countries. To that end, she founded Save the Mothers, an organization headquartered in sub-Saharan Africa that administers the world’s first master’s degree in public health focused on maternal mortality. Under her leadership, the program has produced graduates with the knowledge and training to effect change in their communities.

George Cope, C.M.
Toronto, Ontario

At a corporate and personal level, George Cope is getting Canadians to talk about mental health. As president and chief executive officer of BCE and Bell Canada, he has modelled how corporations can take a leading role in addressing social issues and has championed the importance of being good corporate citizens. His influence, energy and passion have driven the innovative Bell Let’s Talk campaign, which has funded mental health work at Canadian hospitals and research institutions and helped changed behaviour at the grassroots level.

Victor Davies, C.M.
Toronto, Ontario

Victor Davies is a fierce supporter of Canada’s creative music community and one of our most beloved composers. His compositions have broadened the appeal of Canadian contemporary music, and he is regularly commissioned by arts organizations and lay people alike. He has written everything from a rock opera based on the legend of Beowulf to an oratorio entitled Revelation to children’s songs. In addition, his world-renowned Mennonite Piano Concerto has become part of the classical piano repertoire. As an advocate who has helped advance the legal rights of Canadian creators, he regularly shares his industry expertise with fellow musicians.

François Dompierre, C.M., C.Q.
Sutton, Quebec

François Dompierre is a composer who has left his mark on both classical and popular music in Quebec. He has created works for orchestras as well as songs we continue to hum, and music for plays, numerous television movies and films. Some of his audio recordings, such as the one for The Decline of the American Empire, have had a lasting impact on the collective imagination. He also promotes music as the host of a radio program on Radio-Canada and through a series of instructional music books used in Quebec schools.

Terrence Donnelly, C.M., O.Ont.
Toronto, Ontario

Terrence Donnelly’s generosity of spirit is helping to improve the lives of others. Following a prosperous career as a lawyer and businessman, he has become one of our leading health care philanthropists. His belief that success brings with it a golden opportunity to share with those less fortunate than ourselves has driven him to support several institutions focused on biomedical research and life sciences. He is also a constant presence at the University of Toronto and at St. Michael’s Hospital, and remains strongly committed to funding medical education and clinical care.

Morton Doran, C.M.
Fairmont Hot Springs, British Columbia

Morton Doran’s personal story is an inspiration, particularly for those living with disabilities. A retired surgeon and professor of anatomy at the University of Calgary, he has led an exceptional life of achievement while living with the challenging symptoms of Tourette’s syndrome. Beloved by medical students, he won countless awards for his commitment to medical education. He has also brought his passion for teaching to his work with the Tourette Syndrome Foundation of Canada, educating the public and health care professionals about the disorder.

Allan Etmanski, C.M., M.S.M.
Surrey, British Columbia

Family and disability advocate Al Etmanski is a social innovator with transformative impact. He co-founded PLAN, an organization that helps Canadians secure the financial and social futures of loved ones with disabilities. PLAN’s model has now been emulated in more than 30 locations around the world. A great collaborator, Mr. Etmanski also played a key role in the successful efforts to create Canada’s Registered Disability Savings Plan, the first of its kind in the world. He went on to co-found Social Innovation Generation, a partnership devoted to identifying and solving Canada’s most acute social and environmental challenges.

Charles Foran, C.M.
Toronto, Ontario

Writer Charles Foran has garnered acclaim in a remarkably wide range of genres. His articles and literary reviews are a ubiquitous presence in Canada’s print media, his essays have been anthologized and taught at the university level, and his highly praised biography of Mordecai Richler has been called the definitive work of its kind. Fiercely committed to freedom of expression, he is also a past president of PEN Canada and has been credited with that organization’s revitalization.

Cyril Basil Frank, C.M. (deceased)
Calgary, Alberta

Cy Frank advanced orthopedic health care services in Alberta. He was a founder of the Alberta Bone and Joint Institute and the inaugural director of the Institute of Musculoskeletal Health and Arthritis, part of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. He was credited with introducing changes to Alberta’s system for hip and knee replacements that have reduced wait times and the length of post-operative hospital stays. Also a clinical scientist and professor at the University of Calgary, he helped develop methods for grafting and repairing injured knee ligaments and preventing joint osteoarthritis.

The insignia presented to the late Dr. Cyril Frank will be received by his sons, Drs. Ryan and Tym Frank.

Ross Gaudreault, C.M., O.Q.
Saint-Ferréol-les-Neiges, Quebec

Ross Gaudreault has significantly contributed to raising Canada’s profile in the shipping sector and the port industry. As the president and chief executive officer of the Québec Port Authority for nearly 25 years, he gave the Port of Québec an international and innovative dimension by modernizing its infrastructures and diversifying its activities, notably through the development of a cruise terminal. He was the first Canadian to be elected by acclamation as the president of the American Association of Port Authorities, which is made up of regulatory bodies from the three Americas. He also volunteers with many community organizations in his region.

Christiane Germain, C.M., C.Q.
Montréal, Quebec

Christiane German has brought distinctiveness to the Canadian hotel sector. Co-president and co-founder of the Groupe Germain Hospitalité, she re-energized the hotel industry by opening Canada’s first boutique hotels. She also promotes the local economy by using Canadian suppliers. Known for her innovation and business acumen, she sits on several boards of directors in the business and tourist sectors, and is involved in various social and charitable activities.

Jean Giguère, C.M.
Winnipeg, Manitoba

Jean Giguère is a tireless volunteer whose belief in the importance of artistic expression has enriched the cultural life of her city, province and nation. Her exceptional skills at board governance, fundraising and partnership-building has led to the health and sustainability of numerous arts organizations including the Royal Winnipeg Ballet, the Royal Manitoba Theatre Centre and, more recently, the Canadian Museum of History. She is also a leading figure in Culture Days, a national initiative designed to make culture a part of our daily lives.

The Honourable William C. Graham, P.C., C.M.
Toronto, Ontario

Bill Graham has distinguished himself as a lawyer, educator and philanthropist. A prominent litigator, he joined the Faculty of Law at the University of Toronto, where he introduced new courses in the areas of international trade and public laws. He later stood for Parliament, and held senior portfolios in cabinet including foreign affairs and national defence, prior to being selected as the Leader of the Opposition. Since leaving politics, he has supported a range of organizations, and serves as chancellor of Trinity College.

Dorothy Grant, C.M.
Delta, British Columbia

Haida artist, designer and entrepreneur Dorothy Grant creates fashion that is art. Her strong connection to her Haida identity and culture has been the driving force behind her designs, which reflect traditional First Nations imagery and ornamentation. She is best known for pioneering the melding of Northwest Coast designs with haute couture that has garnered an international clientele. Many of her garments have also been collected by museums worldwide.

Jocelyn Greene, C.M.
St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador

Jocelyn Greene has spent her life helping others. In the late 1980s, she began her career as a social worker at the Emmanuel House residential treatment program. Less than five years later, she was appointed as its executive director. Her passion and guidance quickly transformed the organization into Stella’s Circle, one of the province’s largest non-profits, and a leader in the development of affordable housing and social enterprise. Each year, thanks to her direction, the programs at Stella’s Circle help over 800 men and women overcome countless challenges including incarceration, illiteracy, and mental and physical health issues.

H. Wayne Hambly, C.M., O.P.E.I.
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island

Wayne Hambly’s influence can be felt throughout Prince Edward Island. A pillar of the business and community sectors, he has been deeply involved as a volunteer. His generosity of spirit, his commitment and his fundraising networks have benefited social service, educational, health care, cultural and industry organizations. Notably, his leadership of the Confederation Centre of the Arts has resulted in significant capital improvements, a more prominent national presence, and a renewed focus on promoting the Island’s heritage through theatre and the arts.

James D. Irving, C.M.
Saint John, New Brunswick

Jim Irving is one of New Brunswick’s outstanding business and community leaders. His visionary leadership of J. D. Irving, Limited has helped to strengthen the economy in the Maritimes by creating opportunities for sustainable employment. He has also supported local economies by helping to develop the province’s future leaders, by funding programs in business, the environment and forestry at the University of New Brunswick. His philanthropy has also supported various business, nature conservation, health care and educational organizations.

Ronald Jamieson, C.M.
Ohsweken, Ontario

Ronald Jamieson has helped lay the foundation for Aboriginal banking in Canada. One of the first Aboriginal stock brokers in Canada, he saw the need to remove barriers to Indigenous entrepreneurship and provided access to capital. He joined the senior ranks of BMO and created the Aboriginal banking division—making financial services, such as mortgages and loans, accessible to First Nations communities across the country. He has also fostered economic opportunities for Native people and is a founding member and co-chair of the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business.

Sheldon Kennedy, C.M.
Calgary, Alberta

Sheldon Kennedy has brought the issue of child abuse to the forefront of public consciousness. After courageously sharing his own story, this father and professional hockey player fundraised for abuse prevention initiatives by inline skating across Canada. He co-founded Respect Group, an online abuse prevention training organization and has partnered with international bodies to take his message to a global audience. Recently, he was honoured with the naming of Calgary’s new Sheldon Kennedy Child Advocacy Centre, a first-of-its-kind facility that utilizes a collaborative model for investigating and treating child abuse.

Ricardo Larrivée, C.M.
Chambly, Quebec

Ricardo Larrivée encourages people to eat well and makes cooking accessible to everyone. Known for his communication skills and contagious energy, he has had a place in the kitchens and hearts of the people of Quebec for many years as the host of his eponymous daily television program. Moreover, his daily English-language program, “Ricardo and Friends,” is broadcast in close to 50 countries, giving viewers around the world a window into Canadian cuisine. He also has a culinary magazine published in both French and English, as well as cookbooks, and his bilingual website has become an indispensable reference tool. Furthermore, he supports a variety of causes, including breast cancer research, and Tablée des Chefs, a socially involved organization.

James William Leech, C.M.
Toronto, Ontario

Jim Leech is a model of entrepreneurial success and community leadership. His long business career culminated in his stewardship of the Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan, where he introduced innovative pension fund management. He is a champion of pension reform in Canada and a co-author of The Third Rail: Confronting our Pension Failures, an award-winning book on retirement funding and our changing demographic reality. Committed to his community, he has supported initiatives in education, health care and the arts, as well as the Canadian military. He is now the chancellor of Queen’s University.

The Honourable Edward Lumley, P.C., C.M.
Lancaster, Ontario

Ed Lumley has demonstrated a rare combination of business acumen and concern for the public good. A successful entrepreneur, he served as mayor of Cornwall before being elected to Parliament. There, he held key cabinet positions including minister of Industry, Trade and Commerce, where he initiated the Canada-United States Free Trade discussions and helped create more jobs for Canadians. Since leaving politics, he has continued to give back, serving on the board of several prominent Canadian companies and as chancellor of the University of Windsor.

Malcolm Bruce McNiven, C.M.
Montréal, Quebec

Bruce McNiven is a passionate advocate for the preservation of Montréal’s culture and heritage. His voluntary and philanthropic engagement has benefited such organizations as the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, where he played a key role in the acquisition of major works, and Héritage Montréal, through which he has helped protect the city’s architectural gems. His actions, though seldom in the limelight, have also supported various charitable groups, including the Drummond Foundation and the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation, of which he is a founding member and long-standing leader.

Diane Morin, C.M.
Charlemagne, Quebec

A professor in the psychology department and research chair at the Université du Québec à Montréal, Diane Morin is helping to improve the quality of life of persons with intellectual disabilities. She co-authored a book that profoundly changed our understanding of aggressive behaviours associated with intellectual disabilities, leading to new intervention practices and enhanced well-being for those affected. She also developed a scale reflecting our attitudes and beliefs that is being used in several countries and is helping to better target the action needed to change mindsets. Furthermore, she is involved with numerous organizations, including Special Olympics Quebec.

John R. Porter, C.M., C.Q.
Québec, Quebec

John R. Porter has made his mark as an art historian, museologist and professor. Specializing in Quebec’s heritage, he distinguished himself as executive director of the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, where he was responsible for world-class exhibitions and major advances in collection development. At the same time, he helped to advance public knowledge of Quebec art as a professor in Université Laval’s history department and as the author of several books. A mentor and expert who is generous with his time, he also chairs the foundation boards of both the museum and the university.

Marcia Hampton Rioux, C.M.
Toronto, Ontario

Marcia Rioux is dedicated to the advancement of human rights and equality. A distinguished research professor and director of York University’s Institute for Health Research, she has established a new paradigm for the study of disability rights, one that, through a cross-disciplinary lens, focuses on the physical and social barriers that inhibit inclusion. In addition, she created the first graduate program in critical disability studies. She is a driving force in monitoring disability rights worldwide and enhances opportunities for marginalized people to monitor their own rights.

Ronald Rosenes, C.M.
Toronto, Ontario

Ronald Rosenes is an outspoken advocate for people living with HIV/AIDS. Motivated by his own diagnosis more than 30 years ago, he began volunteering with the AIDS Committee of Toronto. Since then, as a volunteer, spokesperson and fundraiser with numerous organizations, he has fought for improved treatment options and faster drug approval processes, and has helped reduce the stigma faced by people living with HIV/AIDS, both here at home and abroad. His passionate and resilient activism continues to shine a light on such issues as aging with HIV and the search for a cure.

Donna Eileen Stewart, C.M.
Toronto, Ontario

Donna Stewart has played a pioneering role in establishing the study of women’s health. From the outset of her career as a hospital psychiatrist and university professor in the 1970s, she improved clinical care for women in both physical and mental health. In 1995, she was appointed to the world’s first research chair in women’s health at the University Health Network and the University of Toronto. Since then, her work has influenced everything from Canada’s drug safety policy to the health of immigrant women. She has also given her time and knowledge to countless Canadian and international health organizations as a devoted volunteer physician.

Ian Tannock, C.M.
Toronto, Ontario

Ian Tannock has spearheaded significant advances in cancer treatment. A professor of medical oncology at Princess Margaret Hospital and a senior scientist at the Ontario Cancer Institute, he is an influential voice in clinical practice. His research demonstrating the effectiveness of chemotherapy in treating late-stage cancers has enabled the development of new chemical agents and lengthened survival rates across North America. He is also recognized for emphasizing the importance of measuring quality of life as an indicator in cancer treatment, and for his devoted mentorship of junior colleagues.

Alan Robert Twigg, C.M.
Vancouver, British Columbia

It has been said that Alan Twigg has a part in the story of almost every British Columbian writer. In addition to being the author of 17 books, he has created a public database of more than 10 000 West Coast authors, eight new literary prizes, a daily news site for the B.C. book industry and, most importantly, BC BookWorld. Founded in 1987, this quarterly newspaper has been hailed as the most essential media outlet for West Coast literary output. Given his further service as a historian, critic, scholar, filmmaker and library trustee, his work stands as a testament to the vitality of British Columbian literature.

Norman Willis, C.M.
Ottawa, Ontario

Norman Willis’ contributions to veterinary science have led to improved health protection for both animals and humans in Canada. He held senior positions at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, where he helped shape national policy on animal health and led international trade negotiations. He led the conception and design of a groundbreaking maximum biocontainment laboratory for animal and human health in Winnipeg, now a world leader in research on avian influenza. He has also served as the president of the World Organisation for Animal Health.

Catherine Zahn, C.M.
Toronto, Ontario

A professor of neuroscience, Catherine Zahn has contributed to advancing mental health research and treatment by building bridges between experts in her field and mental health care practitioners. Currently the president and chief executive officer of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, she has furthered its ongoing redevelopment into a more welcoming, dynamic facility that is integrated into the surrounding neighbourhood. This, along with her public presence and advocacy across the country, has played an important role in shifting societal attitudes towards mental illness.

 

ORDER OF CANADA BACKGROUNDER

Established in 1967 by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, the Order of Canada is the cornerstone of the Canadian Honours System, and recognizes outstanding achievement, dedication to the community and service to the nation. The Order recognizes people in all sectors of Canadian society. Their contributions are varied, yet they have all enriched the lives of others and made a difference to this country.

Motto and Levels

The Order of Canada’s motto is DESIDERANTES MELIOREM PATRIAM(They desire a better country). Her Majesty The Queen is the Sovereign of the Order, and the governor general is the chancellor and Principal Companion of the Order.

Companion – Post-nominal: C.C.
recognizes national pre-eminence or international service or achievement;

Officer – Post-nominal: O.C.
recognizes national service or achievement; and

Member – Post-nominal: C.M.
recognizes outstanding contributions at the local or regional level or in a special field of activity.

Insignia Description

The insignia of the Order is a stylized snowflake of six points, with a red annulus at its centre which bears a stylized maple leaf circumscribed with the motto of the Order, DESIDERANTES MELIOREM PATRIAM (They desire a better country), surmounted by the Royal Crown. It is struck in fine silver and is composed of three individual pieces: the snowflake, annulus and maple leaf. The colour is added by hand through a unique application of opaque and translucent viscous enamel.

The design of the insignia of the Order of Canada dates from 1967, and is credited to Bruce Beatty, C.M., S.O.M., C.D. The technical drawings used by the Royal Canadian Mint in thisnew generation of the insigniawere developed by the Canadian Heraldic Authority at the Chancellery of Honours, part of the Office of the Secretary to the Governor General. The insignia is manufactured by the Mint at its Ottawa facility.

Eligibility

All Canadians are eligible for the Order of Canada, with the exception of federal and provincial politicians and judges while in office. The Order’s constitution permits non-Canadians to be considered for honorary appointments. Members of the Royal Family, governors general and their spouses are appointed in the extraordinary category. There are no posthumous appointments.

Officers and Members may be elevated within the Order in recognition of further achievement, based on continued exceptional or extraordinary service to Canada. Usually, promotions are considered five years after the first appointment.

Nominations

Any person or group is welcome to nominate a deserving individual as a candidate for appointment to the Order of Canada. Appointments are made on the recommendations of the Advisory Council for the Order of Canada, an independent council chaired by the chief justice of Canada. Members of the Advisory Council on the Order of Canada reflect the diversity and excellence in Canadian society. Certain members are appointed by virtue of their office; others are appointed for a fixed term to achieve a balanced representation of the various regions of the country.

For more information about the Order of Canada or to nominate someone,
visit our website at
www.gg.ca/honours.